Outdoor Spaces and Buildings

People need public places to gather — indoors and out. Green spaces, safe streets, sidewalks, outdoor seating and accessible buildings (such as elevators or stairs with railings) can be used and enjoyed by people of all ages. Lansing is currently identifying issues that need to be addressed to make spaces more age-friendly and looking for ways to create additional accessible places for people.
Resources

AARP
  • How to Create a Grandparent Park - In need of a place for children and adults to exercise and spend more time together outdoors, Wichita, Kansas, built a playground for all ages.
  • How to Create a Parklet - In places crowded with streets and structures, small open spaces (even those as small as a parking spot) can provide lots of room to relax. Parklets were first introduced in San Francisco, when an art and design studio created one to call attention to the scarcity of outdoor public spaces compared to the abundance of parking lots. 
  • How to Create, Maintain and Manage an Intergenerational Community Garden - With fresh produce hard for many residents to come by, residents of a Vermont town get down and dirty by working together to grow fruits and vegetables. The Fresh Start Community Farm offers insight to their successful gardening program and shares "how-to" advice for how other communities can grow the food they need. 
  • What Do Seniors Need in Parks? - As America’s population rapidly ages, parks and recreation agencies need to serve people of all ages. Among the useful features to include, according to this report: informative signage, accessible pathways and a variety of active and passive activities. (American Society of Landscape Architects)
  • For more AARP resources on Outdoor Spaces and Buildings, visit their website.
City of Lansing
  • Parks and Recreation Master Plan - The 2015-2020 Parks and Recreation Master Plan was developed as a guide for the City as they work to fulfill the Department’s mission over the next 5 years. The plan not only provides guidance, but is necessary to be eligible for grant funding through the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.